Saturday 3rd November 1984 | Sikh Genocide


In Trilokpuri, despite the change in duty of police officers arising from the intervention of three journalists, the mass killing, pillage and raping carried on until the afternoon of 3rd November. It was only then, survivors of the attacks were eventually evacuated to the relief camps.

In Nangloi, Partap Kaur also recorded in her affidavit that the killing stopped in the afternoon of 3rd November, when the mob dispersed and remaining survivors made their way to the relief camps.

In Palam Colony, Joginder Kaur had been desperately hiding from location to location with her two young children, ever since the mob first attacked her house on 1st November. Her family had managed to flee from the mob but in the chaos that followed on 2nd November, she got separated from her husband and eldest son. She cannot be sure how they met their end but they both fell victim to the genocide. In the early hours of 3rd November, Joginder Kaur took cover in the darkness and hid in the bushes, when the mob came equipped with torches, searching for Sikhs. She was discovered and some of the mobsters began to beat the young boys, she desperately pleaded with them to spare the young boys. One of the mob negotiated with the others to let them take refuge at a nearby Mandir. Initially, they let her go but after a short while, the mob surrounded the Mandir and threatened to burn it down if she was not thrown out. The priest of the Mandir, became agitated and nervous and told Joginder Kaur she would have to leave. Forced out of the door with her two sons, they were now in a very vulnerable position. One of the mob revealed himself as a police officer, when he threw off the blanket he had used to disguise his uniform. During the attacks, the policeman had been leading the mob from within, but now he stepped forward to escort Joginder Kaur and her children to safety. According to the testimony of Joginder Kaur, she heard the confused mob ask the policeman why he had protected this family, whereas in the previous days he had been hunting down and killing Sikhs. The mob protested that due to his action they would be denied a further reward of 500Rs which was being handed out for each Sikh killed.

All over Delhi, the mobs showed persistence in hunting each Sikh to the last. They made repeat visits searching for anyone left hiding in houses which had already been ransacked or for Sikhs who may have taken refuge at a neighbour’s house. This ‘diligence’ may have been driven by monetary gain, as the attackers were paid rewards to kill as many Sikhs as they could. To facilitate this, in some cases the police marshalled the mobs themselves, thus ensuring only Sikhs were the targets and not anybody else. In the afternoon, the mobs disappeared from the streets in a speedy manner without any real force being applied by the newly arrived Army units. This smacks of somebody high up issuing instructions to bring the 3 day orgy to an end and strongly implies the attacks were orchestrated by the highest of authorities. The next day the world’s media would be in Delhi and many heads of state would be present too. With great efficiency, the charred remains strewn all around, were unceremoniously disposed of and the blood washed from the streets, in order that the world did not witness India’s shameful hidden genocide.

In the three days of murder, rape and looting official figures indicate 3000 Sikhs lost their lives in Delhi, however, figures taken from affidavits put the number of dead closer to 6000. Countless more were left homeless and penniless.

Furthermore, an unknown number of Sikhs were killed in the rest of India. No records were kept, but a total estimate of those killed in Delhi and the rest of India has been made at over 10,000 people. As recently as 2011, the site of Hondh-Chillar in Haryana was re-discovered. The small village was formed after the 1947 partition and had originally housed 16 Sikh families who settled there. But since 1984, it has been left deserted and untouched. All that remains are the ruins of the burnt out homes and the bones of the victims who perished. Upon discovery, further investigations were carried out that indicated at least 32 people had been killed, but none of these killings appeared in any official records.

In November 1984, the Congress party had used all the levers of the state, to murder its own citizens and no organisation in India had the will to stop them. In a campaign of hate, Congress targeted the Sikhs as the ‘enemy within’ and portrayed themselves as the protectors of the nation. The Congress Party machinery orchestrated this plan in order to maintain their grip on power and at the expense of all the citizens of India, the Congress elite continued to line their pockets. via sikhrelief.org

| Sikh Genocide

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